Eddie Hermida of Suicide Silence chats touring and new music!

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Last night I headed out to House of Blues to catch up with a band that we’ve had some really great moments with over the years. Until now though, we hadn’t sat down with the current lead vocalist Eddie Hermida. Eddie came into the band early 2013 under some very high expectations from fans. Former longtime vocalist Mitch Lucker passed unexpectedly a few months earlier and Eddie has easily been accepted into the position. Suicide Silence’s live show is insane matching their last album too. They have been nothing but incredibly successful and absolutely slayed it last night in Boston.

In our new one with Eddie, he talks how current touring has been going as well as what is coming up for the band. Continue on for our new one and find them out as main support with Korn now!

Soft one to start because you guys have been touring so much really since the last record came out, maybe a little bit before that. The three things you must have with you while on tour?

Must have with me, my wits. A strong desire to play every night and clean underwear.

Always crucial.

Yeah, I don’t really abide by the whole material things because eventually you lose everything. If you are bummed because you lost your favorite pair of shoes on tour, then that is your fault. Not the fans fault. There you go!

And how have these dates been going? You’ve been in this band for a few years now. Last time we interviewed Suicide Silence I believe was only the second tour that you did with the band. You had a positive reaction right from the get go. People were chanting your name before you had even come on stage. It’s been very positive. How is it now that kids have kind of grown with you?

They’re still very pumped on the fact that the band kept going. I think that everybody really, really likes the direction the band is going in right now. Everybody is really happy with the overall sound. I hear kids tell me that they can close their eyes and see Mitch if they really want to and I hear fans that say that they don’t really think about it. They see Suicide Silence as a new thing so however each fan sees it, however they feel most comfortable at our shows? All I’m there to do is make them feel happy and if I’m doing that, I’m winning.

Then the last record has been out for a little over a year now. Is this something where you guys are currently working on something new, do you think you’re still going to wait a little while?

Yeah I mean right now we’re not really putting any pressure on ourselves to write something. It’s not like hey man we need to have something new done by this time or else. We’re not so nervous about the general escape of music. More so we are concerned with making sure that we’re ready to write. We’re not just going to force ourselves to sit down and start putting out music. That’s one of the most ridiculous or absurd things a musician can do because it’s not really allowing themselves to be channeling energies and emotions. So I mean our big concern is to get home. Sit down, focus on jamming and just vibing each other out and seeing where that road takes us.

Perfect, then you are on that last record and you were involved in. How do you think the writing process goes for the band now? Is it one person, more collective?

I think it’s going to stay how it’s always been which is the band gets together and they jam a couple of tunes together. They figure some stuff out then I come in and help them kind of put the bow on top of the box. I help make it a nice little complete package. I’ll be there for the whole process. I’ll be there for every moment. I think that’s one difference between us now and us before. Where they would kind of meet up before, write their stuff and then I would come in but I think for this one, I’m going to be there the whole time. I’m going to be incorporating with different instruments and trying to see if I can jam out on some keys. Try to do something new.

Then I wanted to ask you, you’ve been a long time touring musician as well. This obviously wasn’t your first band. Maybe when did you first come to know that you wanted to do music. When did you know this is something that you wanted to do?

Very early on. It was kind of like a calling. I want to say in like second grade or something like that. I was like seven years old and I remember there was this assembly. One of those multi-use room assemblies that they used to hold in elementary school. These six musicians come in and I remember them like breaking down the music to Pink Panther. Explaining that music can have the same theme. Have the same overall tones but it could be two completely different things while being the same thing at once. I remember thinking that and being like wow that’s so complex. I would love to learn that. I would love for that to be my focus in school. Inadvertently, I kind of did that. I just kind of like started playing trombone in second grade and kept on throughout middle school, high school. A little bit in college. In high school, around when I was sixteen years old, I started really falling in love with metal. I was already a fan of that type of music but when I was sixteen I really wanted to be in a band. From that point on, I started kind of pursuing that and it wasn’t until about twenty two years old when I got my first chance to actually tour and here I am today.

Great! Then maybe for you, the first CD or first cassette you can remember ever buying as a kid and the first concert you can remember going to?

One of the first CD’s I purchased, I want to say, was like Cannibal Corpse and Suffocation. My buddy and I had just taken our allowance. We were like thirteen or fourteen, something like that. No I was a little bit older I think I was like fifteen. I had just gotten my license and we drove ourselves to the local CD spot and we were like looking through the aisles. He had been jamming a little bit of some death metal like local death metal that we liked and we were like oh man those vocals are cool. Then we were like let’s pick the most gruesome album covers we can find. I found “Pierced from Within” by Suffocation and he found “Tomb of the Mutilated” by Cannibal Corpse. Those are kind of the first two CD’s that I actually bought. After that, I bought a lot more. At the point, Korn already had “Korn” and “Life is Peachy” out and I remember they were like “Follow the Leader” had just come out when I was like sixteen. It had been out for like a couple of months at this point. It was like the best thing out there. I remember wanted to pick up those records. The first one that I ever bought, like really, really bought was Suffocations’ “Pierced from Within”. It just stood out. It called out to me. That’s kind of the formulation of where I am today because I want to be in a band and I am in a band. I feel like it sounds like the perfect mixture of Suffocation and Korn so it’s kind of a cool thing.

Perfect, then to end it off! You’ve been touring a lot lately, you kind of talked about going home for a bit and not putting a lot of pressure on the writing but kind of what’s coming up? Do you think you’re going to be taking a bit of a breather? You guys have been so active.

Yeah since we are going to be writing, we’re not going to be touring much. I don’t know about other musicians but I know for a fact the road isn’t very conducive to sitting down and actually focusing on music. There’s so many things going on. Interviews, catering times, friends coming out to shows so you have to entertain your buddies. You have to entertain fans if you want to meet them, if you want to hang out with them which I like to do. So there’s not a lot of time in the day to actually sit down and have a really introspective moment to write. During the time that we’re writing and focusing on that, we’re going to be at home and taking some time off. It’s not really time off because you’re still focusing on your art and you’re focusing on your band. I don’t know man, I’ll rest when I’m dead really. That’s when it will be time to actually sit down and take off the battery packs and just chill the fuck out.

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