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RPM's debut album is a collection of songs that defies conventional pop standards while delivering infectious and undeniably well-crafted rock-influenced songs. RPM effectively transcends gender stereotypes with lyrical content that doesn't wallow in "pms-propelled subject matter". Tackling issues such as suicide, conformity, and organized religion, RPM's blatant irreverence sets her apart from all other mainstream artists and is a needed slap in the face in the era of easy to digest corporatesanitized rock.

1. For people who may not have heard some music from you yet... what can someone who's never heard of you expect from your music?

That it rocks'€¦and its about something.

2. Your album has just been released. Are you pleased with the response you have received so far?

I am'€¦ actually '€“ and this may sound fucked up but '€“ I'€™m most excited about the few people who have hated it so much that they have written to my publicist. They got so offended by what I was saying, or just my liner notes, that they actually felt compelled to act. What I wanted most with this album was to be heard. And I am being heard'€¦ But I do love some of the reviews when people like it'€¦who wouldn'€™t, right?

3. Could you briefly summarize your album?

Shit!'€¦not really. It'€™s hard for me to do that. Ok. Ummm. Its 11 tracks, rock'€¦lyrically driven, heavy on guitars'€¦

4. In your biography your album is describes as '€œA testament of your sick mind'€. Could you explain this?

'€œA testament to my sick mind'€: It'€™s a lyric from GODDAMNIT - which in the song is making reference to the Old & New Testament(s), while, on a different level, is making a comment about myself'€¦in the bio? '€“ I didn'€™t write it '€“ But I think it is referring to the fact that people react strongly to my views and sometimes site me as being '€œsick'€ or '€œunconventional'€ - you know. It'€™s your basic reference to the fact that I embrace my viewpoints even if they aren'€™t socially acceptable.

5. Your producer and songwriting Frank Gryner has worked a couple of great artists like Rob Zombie and A Perfect Circle. How was it to work with him and how did he influence you?

It was, and continues to be, an amazing experience. Going into the process I already had a very clear voice and vision of where I was going'€¦what Frank helped me do was refine my writing and music to carefully reflect exactly what I wanted to say'€¦and play. I think I grew a lot as a writer, musician and performer during our year of writing together. And we'€™re still working our asses off! We are knee deep in our second record.

6. In the album-sleeve you have written a little piece. In this piece you are angry about quite some things. How come? Are things not going so well in the USA as the USA would like us to believe?

I am angry'€¦really fucking angry. Things going well in the US? We have a President hell bent on starting wars, lying to the public, turning our social value system back to 1950 while not-so-subtly enforcing his Christian views on all of America '€“ eroding the separation of church and state. We have kids without healthcare, people living on the streets, drugs, a national debt close to half a trillion dollars'€¦Arnold as a governor?! Schools where kids don'€™t even have books or enough chairs to sit in'€¦I mean'€¦I could go on for an hour. No. The propaganda is bullshit and I am pissed about it.

7. How did you come to the conclusion to begin a career as a music artist?

I was 8 when I performed sang in my first show'€¦and that same year I took up piano. It'€™s been in my blood my entire life. I didn'€™t decide it'€¦it decided on me.

8. How do you separate yourselves from other artists?

In my head I am clearly different, right? Because it'€™s me'€¦and I know I am trying to evoke reactions and thought. I write about things that are more relevant than clothing and dating. I write my own material, I sing on pitch without any computers or vocal tuning, I play guitar on stage and do my own solos... Me, and my album, are organic and based on a foundation of a shit load of work and the love of this art. That'€™s, unfortunately, different -- in mainstream music at least.


9. Has your degree in Epic Literature given you the ability to write advanced lyrics [more content]?

I think it has definitely influenced how I write and view the writing process'€¦ I want the lyrics to stand on their own. It definitely helped broaden my view of language and style'€¦words and what they can achieve. And how they can last.

10. What would you like to achieve with your music and career?

Consistent growth'€¦a world tour or 2'€¦a sold out stadium'€¦And with my music? I hope I help open lines of communication. I hope I get people talking'€¦even if they are disagreeing. And I hope I get people thinking'€¦and rocking out at the same time.

11. What artists are you listening to at the minute?

AC/DC, Closure, DMX, Eminem'€¦

12. What's the one music album you love that everyone else seems to hate?

Don'€™t have one really'€¦though I think everyone is sick of me playing Guns '€˜N Roses.

13. If you ran the industry you work in, you would...'€™

Start over. Fire everyone. Hire people with taste and a backbone. Work with the internet revolution instead of against it.

14. What celebrity/person would you want downloaded onto your hard drive and stored for all time?

No one. There is enough in my head'€¦and on my hard drive. I need a new computer.

15. Do you have anything to say to the MusicRemedy.com'€™s visitors?

Yes! Keep Rocking and Keep Thinking'€¦.And buy my album at www.rpm.tv.

I would like to thank RPM for doing this interview and Ben for setting up the interview. Thanks again!

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